5 Reasons to Deliver a Great Speech

Here is a list of the most important 5 reasons to deliver a great speech. This will motivate you in improving your public speaking skills and give you a new perspective on how crucial gaining the attention of your audience is.

1. Get Feedback

Validating your concepts is one of the best reasons to speak in public. Let’s say you have a business idea you think’s gonna be the next Google. Well, that’s your opinion. Presenting it to a crowd is the first stress test. You’ll get a chance to see how well you can fit your unique value proposition in a 5 or 10 minute slot . You’ll see how people react to it. Whether they have question or whether your message is clear enough. You may choose to imagine the people in the audience as potential users and customers. If they ramp up a round of applause, you just may have a chance of turning the cool idea into a real business model. Otherwise – you probably should sleep on it and see what (else) you can come up with.

2. Gain Confidence

If what you are presenting actually is worth while, your audience will most likely let you know it. Even your competitors won’t be able to contain their enthusiasm. This will boost you ego-batteries and will help you stay up and running during long nights of work on your project. There is nothing more valuable than to see your work appreciated.

However, even the best idea needs a great speaker in order to be delivered properly to the public. All the more reason for you to improve your skills in this area.

3. Give worth to you ideas by sharing them with the world

Without its 350+ million users, Facebook is just an web application and a farm of servers. A great web application, but just an app nonetheless. The same way, the greatest assets of your business are just stuff without other people noticing then, appreciating them and wanting them. The understanding and appreciation of others is a prerequisite of any project you may have. This is another good reason for you to make serious efforts to spread the word. And a public presentation is the best opportunity for that: the passion, the enthusiasm and the intrinsic value your project encompasses can spread to a few hundred people in seconds.

Not to mention, if you’re that good, they’ll be tweeting about it from the iPods and BlackBerrys in a matter of seconds.

Remember: a public presentation will reach your audience more than your presence in social media can ever hope to.

4. Attract resources

Speaking in public is a great way of pitching investors and new partners. Don’t be surprised if after a riveting presentation, some guy in a suit  will ask you questions about your project and tell you he’s willing to give some money for a piece of equity. Even better, your vision may resonate with people in the audience, some of which may be interested to become your partners and help you develop your business.

The truth is you cannot exactly now how it can happen, but delivering a great speech can only help you attract the resources you need in order to improve your initiatives.

5. Gain Trust

There is no better way to gain the trust of users, developers and customers than by delivering a strong message in an attractive, confident manner. No matter how many articles they read about you on TechCrunch, seeing/hearing you deliver or demonstrate a great product is always a richer experience. If in the 5-10 minutes, you’ll manage to get them hooked/curious, half of the battle is won. Don’t forget, enthusiasm is contagious and is airborne. Of course, you can hope to “infect” them with enthusiasm using the wonders of technology (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, AdSense), but a first hand experience with you and your message is irreplaceable.

Delivering a great presentation is often the key to breaking through to those first hundred passionate users who can later help you in developing and evangelizing your product.

VisageCloud – Face recognition meets Big Data

Bogdan Written by:

One Comment

  1. Cosmin
    May 17, 2010

    dude, you want me to do proof-reading for you ? 3 posts now, and I’ve seen noticeable typos already :))

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